Winter Wellness: Digestive Wellness & Recipes for the Holidays

by Kameko Shibata

Welcome to the cooler weather, a time for warm meals, intimate gatherings, early nights, stillness and reflection, as we move into the darker days of winter. Sounds enticing, but likely allusive as the onslaught of winter holidays, family gatherings, colds/ flus, and winter blues kick in. This yea I will be offering three separate Ayurvedic discussions and mini-practices to support a more digestively healthy, mentally calm, compassionate and motivated winter season. That’s truly something to rejoice!

Using the wisdom of Ayurveda, Indian classical medicine, and whole food nutrition we will learn some basic tips on how to make healthy decisions and support yourself emotionally during the holidays.  These tips will focus on how to properly combine food, how to nourish your body during the winter, and how to create a healthy relationship with food during the holiday season. You will also receive some simple recipes and learn about spices to help create more delicious and Ayurvedic friendly holiday meal plan. For example, here is one of my favorite recipes to make during this season:

Miso SoupCalifornia Miso Soup

This is my favorite breakfast of all time. As a Californian part Japanese yogini, this is the perfect blend of traditional and contemporary, with an Ayurvedic twist. It’s light but warming, and full of fresh veggies which is ideal for breakfast and can be made hardy by adding protein. It’s balancing for all Ayurvedic doshas or types. It takes about 20 minutes depending on the ingredients and how small you cut the veggies. I often make a batch for a few days and re-warm in the morning.

The ginger makes it warming and helps the belly build agni, or digestive fire, and the turmeric is cleansing and anti inflammatory, helping remove ama or toxins from the belly. If these concepts interest you, consider attending the special class this Monday, November 17 to learn about what foods and spices build agni (digestive fire) and which ones weaken it, which foods clear toxins (ama) and which ones increase toxins in my Ayurvedic Winter Wellness series!

Ingredients Needed:

  • Fresh Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Dark Greens (Can be Kale, Chard, Collards, or Arugula)
  • Miso Paste
  • 1/2 cup Quinoa or Rice
  • 1 Egg (optional)
  • Meat/Fish (optional)
  • 1 Avocado
  • Cilantro (garnish)
  • 1 Piece Kombu Seaweed (optional but traditional)
  • 2 Red Potatoes
  • 2 Japanese Sweet Potatoes
  • 1 Onion (optional)
  1. Boil 2 quarts purified water with ample fresh grated ginger and turmeric,  kombu seaweed, red potatoes, 2 japanese sweet potatoes, and 1 onion.
  2. When the sweet potatoes are soft but not done add chopped kale or collards, for quicker miso add chard or arugula. Add optional wakame seaweed or sea palm for minerals and veggie protein.
  3. Turn off the soup, and mix in miso paste ( you never want to boil miso). Try this easy mixing trick: fill a mug with the broth, add paste to it and stir with a fork to break up miso , then add the broth paste back to the whole soup.
  4. Add egg, quinoa, rice, or meat/fish for protein (you can poach an egg in the water before you add the paste or cook it on the side)
  5. Garnish with avocado, fresh cilantro and a drop of ume plum vinegar. This makes its spectator!

KamekoProfileB

Check out Kameko’s upcoming Winter Wellness Series at Namaste Monday, January 19.

WELLNESS TREATMENTS WITH KAMEKO: Kameko Shibata combines her passion for ayurvedic medicine, bodywork and yoga into a comprehensive healing modality that empowers people to heal themselves. She received her Ayurvedic Practioner certification from the Dhyana Center of Health Sciences, where she went on to complete over 1,000 hours in a 2-year internship under her teacher, DeAnna Batdorff.

Kameko’s healing hours: Saturdays 10:15am – 2pm
Please check out : 
www.kamekoarts.com

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Creating a Healthy Sleep Ritual

Let’s talk sleep. Having a healthy relationship with sleep is one of the most important things you can do in your life. Lack of sleep not only leaves you fatigued but can result in an onslaught of other health issues including heart disease, high blood pressure, memory loss, weight gain, low libido, depression, and impaired judgement.

With so much stimulation within reach at all times (think your phone, TV, computer, music) it can be difficult to create a healthy night time routine. Here are our three tips for creating a nightly ritual that aids in soothing the nervous system, calming the mind, and relaxing the body:

Early Afternoon – Pre-sleep Tips:

  • Avoid caffeine or naps after 3 PM
  • Avoid exercise 2-3 hours before your bedtime

sleep

Early Evening – Step 1: Slow Your Digestion

Try to avoid drinking or eating within four hours of bed time. Your body needs to wind down around 7 PM and eating a large dinner may inhibit your body’s ability to rest. You don’t want your stomach to be working on digesting food when it should be resting. Rather, try to have your biggest meals of the day in the morning and tier off to have a small, light entree for dinner.

Same goes for drinks. Drinking that extra glass of wine at dinner will only keep you up later in the night. Alcohol is proven to cause sleeping issues so you are better off switching to a soothing, herbal tea after dinner. Make sure not to try to catch up on your water intake before bed either. This way your body can focus on relaxation rather than waking up throughout the night to use the restroom.

sleep

Late Evening – Step 2: Unplug Your Brain

Around 9 or 10 PM, unplug your electronics. Exposure to light from your computer , TV, or phone screen is a big no-no when it comes to sleep health. One thing your body needs is for there to be reduced light in order for your pineal gland to work its magic making melatonin. If you continue to sit in from of the television your brain will not have the opportunity to unwind making it much more difficult to not just fall asleep but also stay asleep.

Trade scrolling your newsfeed for reading a good book, some restorative yoga, a candle light meditation, painting, or journaling. Anything that will help you unwind your mind without causing you additional stress or mental fatigue. Take this last hour or two before bedtime to sweeten your day with some loving self-care practices. These activities can help you feel grounded, relaxed, and ready to let go of what this day so you can welcome tomorrow with open arms.

sleep

Bed Time – Step 3: Relax Into Sleep

Brush your teeth, take a few deep slow breaths, maybe incorporate an evening self-massage with lavender infused body oil, and crawl into bed. Make sure that your room is completely dark and cool, around 60-70 degrees, and that you have bedding that makes you feel comfortable and supported. Being in a completely dark environment is important for your body’s sleep cycles and will allow the most natural, healthy sleep possible.


Having difficulty sleeping?

Namaste offers a variety of relaxation workshops and classes year round that aid in insomnia and stress. Try one of weekly Restorative Yoga classes or check out our upcoming workshop calendar for workshops like Yoga Nidra with Ashley Sharp or Restorative Yoga with Vickie Russell Bell.

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Why We Love Dry Brushing

You wake up to misty morning dew and do your best to not hit snooze thinking how pleasant it would be to stay curled in your warm bed all day. This is the kind of morning that begs for warming self-care practices like a hot cup of lemon water and a stimulating dry brush routine! Never heard of dry brushing? Get ready to learn about one of your new favorite morning rituals.

Bathroom window_dry brushing

Dry brushing is a simple activity with incredible health benefits. With the help of a non-synthetic dry body brush, you take a few minutes to massage yourself from head to toe, sans water, usually prior to showering. One of your body’s largest organs and most important for detoxification is the skin. Responsible for a quarter of the body’s daily detoxing, your skin receives one-third of all the blood circulated throughout your body. This means it is usually the first also to exhibit signs of deficiency and imbalance. Dry brushing is the perfect way to aid your body in its detoxification process and helps as a quick warm up by kick starting circulation during chilly mornings.

dry brushing

The benefits of dry brushing include:

  • Removing layers of dead skin that can lead to acne, eczema, or psoriasis.
  • Removal of dead skin leads to better circulation and increases your skin’s ability to discharge metabolic waste.
  • Better circulation means more blood flow to the areas you are brushing, increasing the electromagnetic energy and leaving you feeling energized for the day.
  • Circular movement made while brushing, paired with increased blood flow, helps stimulate nerve endings and the movement of fat leading to better muscle tone. 
  • Stimulation of your oil glands and hormones helps the appearance of skin leaving you looking more youthful and decreasing cellulite. 
  • Most important, the process of massaging your outer organ helps to cleanse your lymphatic system, leading to an immunity boost and less mucoid matter in your organs.

Dry brushing is as easy as 1, 2, 3. Here’s how:

Purchase a non-synthetic dry body brush. You can usually find one at your health food store or online. Be gentle on injured areas or places with skin irritations and the breasts.

  1. Start at your feet and begin by vigorously rubbing in circular motions. The tingling feeling may feel slightly awkward or uncomfortable at first, but it begins to become enjoyable as you body warms up.
  2. Slowly and intentionally work your way up the body, rubbing in towards your heart center as you reach your arms and back.
  3. When you reach the abdomen, spend slightly more time and rub slowly in counter-clockwise strokes.

When you finish, simply bathe or shower and for added benefits consider a self-massage after your rinse with healthy body oils like our EarthBody oils, coconut oil, or sesame oil!

IMG_6987

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Why You Should Always Practice Savasana

by Judy Rukat

[This post originally appears on DoYouYoga.com]

I often remind students at the end of teaching a challenging and sweaty Hot Power Yoga Flow class that we show up to the practice for the Savasana.
It is the moment of surrender when the idea of self dissolves, when we release the burdens that plague the body, the fears that invade the mind, and the expectations we place upon ourselves–inviting liberation to awaken from deep within the psyche.

How Do I Get Liberation?

Freedom is the natural state. At the core of human existence, a primal need to survive motivates us to exist within the structures of society—creating boundaries and limitations through which we channel ambitions and desires, and confront personal, relational and global conflicts.

All of these are real, of course.However, just as there is no denying that sustaining a Warrior III pose is a definite struggle, the struggle alone does not define the experience of yoga or of life. If anything, I encourage a physically challenging practice to break down the walls we have in place that define who we are in the world.

Those walls construct the much-needed ego, without them I could not be I, nor you would not be you. These beautiful distinctions provide individuality and a medium through which we engage our unique selves…and coexist, fall in love, and break apart to keep the cycle in motion.

Who Do You Think You Are?

However, we are NOT merely who we THINK we are. Savasana puts us back in our place, so to speak. Practicing at least five minutes serves as a visit home, where we invite presence or an acknowledgment of being right here and right now into the moment.

This we do without projecting into an undefined future or remaining stagnant in memories.

A few moments of simply observing BEing nothing more than an infinite state of blossoming rejuvenates the spirit and invites freedom from the depths into everyday life.

Savasana is peace.
Freedom is peace.
You are peace. Nothing more.


JudyProfileAnewI teach yoga for the rebels, the rogues, the weak, broken, and damaged, the lost and hopeless, the underdog, the ones who only know struggle, the motherless, the addicts, and those who love too much. I am all of these, and I know that a vast ocean of peace lies beneath all this. I’ll never tell you what yoga is and isn’t, you decide for yourself. Just show up and find what liberates you on your mat! Connect with me on Instagram and Facebook.

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A Note on Yoga for Grief

by Ken Breniman

Grief is a multifaceted response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something, who has passed away, to which a bond or affection was formed. Although conventionally focused on the emotional response to loss, it also has physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, spiritual, and philosophical dimensions. Source: Wikipedia 

I am very honored to be offering the Yoga for Grief: Healing Hearts/Healing Bodies gathering at Namaste Berkeley on Saturday, December 17th. I have been offering this workshop for the past six years throughout the Bay Area and have learned so much from the participants.

In the ancient story of “Kisa Gotami and the Mustard Seed”, Ms. Gotami realizes some form of loss has touched everyone. Over my years of leading grief healing sessions, I have realized this continues to be a truth in our modern-day society. In my experience, I have come to understand the main difference with societies understanding of grief today is how grief is quickly pathologized and so often grieving persons can feel isolated and not understood. Historically, the process of grieving has gone through many evolutionary changes due to pressure individuals receive to handle a loss in a way that is culturally acceptable.

The practice of embalming, which became standard in the funerary business around the turn of the 20th century, further dissociated us from death. Funerary directors, like doctors, became authority figures and took over the mourning process, while embalming changed how the body felt, looked, and smelled. “It’s amazing how we can block out the truth of death,” says Frank Ostaseski, who founded Zen Hospice in 1987 and the Metta Institute in 2004,  which are based in Northern California and offer educational programs about death, dying, and mourning. . “If you are surrounded by a family or a culture that says, ‘Don’t talk or think about it,’ it can hinder our capacity to acknowledge the loss.” – Excerpt from Grief is Good

My hope is that my workshop and other gatherings for the bereaved can help to normalize the grieving process. The gathering is here to provide space and create a supportive community setting for each person to show up with all their feelings and memories. Once individuals feel comfortable enough to recognize the feelings of loss we move into being able to tap into the healing powers of a yoga practice that is specifically modified to address many of the aspects of grief.

Please remember that if you are experiencing loss whether it is from early childhood or more recent, that grief can easily get stored in the body. And also remember that the human heart grieves all different types of loss. Never feel that somehow what you are grieving is ‘lesser than’ or doesn’t deserve healing. Loss can include the death of a person, death of a pet, a life transition such as a break up, a divorce, losing a job or moving. Many past participants have come to mourn the loss of a healthy happy childhood. The gathering is open to anyone who is experiencing any loss. In addition to yoga, breathwork and relaxation practices, there is also an optional ear acupuncture session offered at the end of the workshop during an extended Yoga Nidra.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the upcoming workshop or are interested in learning more about healthy grieving.


KenProfileAKen has practiced yoga for over 10 years and became certified with Yoga Alliance as a RYT-200 after graduating from Yoga Tree’s Yoga Teacher Training program in 2006. Yoga Alliance has recognized him as a ERYT-200/RYT-500 as he completed his Yoga Therapy training at Ananda Seva Mission in July 2010.   Ken is very excited to be joining the Namaste family.

In his classes, Ken provides eclectic non-denominational Hatha yoga guidance, honoring a variety of traditions, such as Iyengar alignment principles, invigorating Kudalini Kriya, and playful Acroyoga-inspired partner work.  He invites you to embrace SIMPLICITY, PATIENCE and COMPASSION as you deepen your practice and your connection with your true Self. Ken offers Yoga Therapy workshops on a variety of topics such as restorative yoga, grief, relationships, stress management and coping with chronic illness.  In addition to yoga, Ken also serves as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, clinical supervisor and a private practice yoga therapist in the Bay Area. Daniel Quinn and Paulo Coelho are among his favorite authors.

His life work of service is inspired by Ram Dass’ words:  “We are all just walking each other hOMe.”

Please visit Ken’s website at www.kenbreniman.com  or email him at kjbreniman@gmail.

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Kameko's Traditional Herbal Chai

Fall is here and we are not waiting a second longer to start indulging in delicious vata pacifying, soul soothing, autumn inspired meals! Up first on our menu, Namaste teacher and Ayurvedic practitioner Kameko Shibata’s Traditional Herbal Chai recipe:

Traditional Herbal Chai

Begin by boiling the green cardamon pods until they look full and bloated. You can reboil with fresh water and the same spices for several days in 3-4 qt. of fresh water (grab a big pot!)

Chai TeaIngredients:
3 cinnamon sticks
2-3 TBSP green cardamom pods, whole coriander seeds
1 TBSP whole black pepper
1 TBSP fennel seed -optional- for summer and digestive support
tons of grated ginger
2 star anise (optional)
traditionally assam black tea was added at the end, milk and sugar (jaggery)

Chai Tea

Enjoy as a sweet morning drink or afternoon pick-me-up. Send us your pictures of your homemade chai by tagging us on instagram  at @ilovenamaste using the hashtag #MyChai!


Kameko

Check out Kameko’s upcoming Fall Ayurvedic Cleanse at Namaste! Begins this Saturday, October 4.

WELLNESS TREATMENTS WITH KAMEKO: Kameko Shibata combines her passion for ayurvedic medicine, bodywork and yoga into a comprehensive healing modality that empowers people to heal themselves. She received her Ayurvedic Practioner certification from the Dhyana Center of Health Sciences, where she went on to complete over 1,000 hours in a 2-year internship under her teacher, DeAnna Batdorff.

Kameko’s healing hours: Saturdays 10:15am – 2pm
Please check out : 
www.kamekoarts.com

Please follow and like us:
20

Kameko’s Traditional Herbal Chai

Fall is here and we are not waiting a second longer to start indulging in delicious vata pacifying, soul soothing, autumn inspired meals! Up first on our menu, Namaste teacher and Ayurvedic practitioner Kameko Shibata’s Traditional Herbal Chai recipe:

Traditional Herbal Chai

Begin by boiling the green cardamon pods until they look full and bloated. You can reboil with fresh water and the same spices for several days in 3-4 qt. of fresh water (grab a big pot!)

Chai TeaIngredients:
3 cinnamon sticks
2-3 TBSP green cardamom pods, whole coriander seeds
1 TBSP whole black pepper
1 TBSP fennel seed -optional- for summer and digestive support
tons of grated ginger
2 star anise (optional)
traditionally assam black tea was added at the end, milk and sugar (jaggery)

Chai Tea

Enjoy as a sweet morning drink or afternoon pick-me-up. Send us your pictures of your homemade chai by tagging us on instagram  at @ilovenamaste using the hashtag #MyChai!


Kameko

Check out Kameko’s upcoming Fall Ayurvedic Cleanse at Namaste! Begins this Saturday, October 4.

WELLNESS TREATMENTS WITH KAMEKO: Kameko Shibata combines her passion for ayurvedic medicine, bodywork and yoga into a comprehensive healing modality that empowers people to heal themselves. She received her Ayurvedic Practioner certification from the Dhyana Center of Health Sciences, where she went on to complete over 1,000 hours in a 2-year internship under her teacher, DeAnna Batdorff.

Kameko’s healing hours: Saturdays 10:15am – 2pm
Please check out : 
www.kamekoarts.com

Please follow and like us:
20

4 Ways to Welcome Autumn's Vata Energy

This past weekend marked the Autumn Equinox and the beginning of the Ayurvedic Vata season. Ayurveda, yoga’s sister science, often correlates seasonal changes with physical and mental changes we may experience within our bodies and minds. Fall is associated with dryness, spontaneity, creativity, airiness, and anxiety.

Too much Vata and you may be left feeling unable to focus, nervous, or overwhelmed with excessive speech or thoughts. An overload of Vata in the body may be causing symptoms like lack of appetite, joint stiffness, and dry skin. In order to balance these characteristics we must pay close attention to how we nourish our bodies through diet, movement, and spiritual practices. Here are a few simple suggestions for some things you can do in each area to help welcome this exciting new season:

Movement: Get Grounded

Try to integrate more standing poses like Warrior 1 and 2, Side Angle Pose, and Triangle. Make sure when you are moving from one pose to the next you avoid any hops or quick transitions. Rather, to combat the frenzied Vata energy, you hold the poses for longer and slowly, deliberately transition from one to the next. During your practice, you can engage your Mula Bandha for more stability and focus on longer exhales to ground your mind.

AshleyWest-1
Namaste Teacher Ashley West Roberts

Nutrition: Warm Up

As the weather cools, our need to heat up increases. Warm yourself from the inside out. Start with warm lemon water in the mornings and spicy herbal teas throughout the afternoon. For lunch and dinner, try cooked vegetables like asparagus, beets, carrots, and sweet potatoes with lots of ginger, cinnamon, and turmeric. Avoid sweets, cold dishes or drinks, dry fruits (apples or pears), and dairy products.

Lemon Tea

Mindfulness: Create Structure

It is important to create a routine during the Vata intense season in order to help the mind stay focused, and the body stay regular. Make a point to engage in some daily rituals like morning dry brushing (great for detoxification), Abhyanga/oil massage, or a warming meditation accompanied by soothing music. Other suggestions would be to choose movement activities that are not too strenuous, but instead focus on flexibility and balance. Seek out Hatha or Yin classes over Vinyasa based yoga in order to keep yourself balanced.

Wellness Tools

Spirituality: Feel Connected

Fall is one of the best seasons to get outside and experience nature’s transformation for yourself. Find a local park or hiking trail where you can sit and notice the brisk autumn winds, dewy mornings, and crinkly colored leaves. Do your best throughout the week to remind yourself of this connection you have with nature. Maybe it means having a small token, such as a beautiful leaf or pinecone, that sits with you on your desk. Another idea would be to rise early; Ayurveda recommends 6 AM during the Autumn months so that you can get the most sunlight possible as our days begin to shorten.

Dog Fall Outdoors


10174922_10202666021745158_698447662340860057_nA San Diego native, Emily moved to the Bay Area four years ago to work with small businesses and non-profits and help them share their stories. Outside of work you can find her hiking the Oakland hills with her dogs, cooking up healthy eats, or volunteering with organizations like Bay Area Wilderness Training.

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20

4 Ways to Welcome Autumn’s Vata Energy

This past weekend marked the Autumn Equinox and the beginning of the Ayurvedic Vata season. Ayurveda, yoga’s sister science, often correlates seasonal changes with physical and mental changes we may experience within our bodies and minds. Fall is associated with dryness, spontaneity, creativity, airiness, and anxiety.

Too much Vata and you may be left feeling unable to focus, nervous, or overwhelmed with excessive speech or thoughts. An overload of Vata in the body may be causing symptoms like lack of appetite, joint stiffness, and dry skin. In order to balance these characteristics we must pay close attention to how we nourish our bodies through diet, movement, and spiritual practices. Here are a few simple suggestions for some things you can do in each area to help welcome this exciting new season:

Movement: Get Grounded

Try to integrate more standing poses like Warrior 1 and 2, Side Angle Pose, and Triangle. Make sure when you are moving from one pose to the next you avoid any hops or quick transitions. Rather, to combat the frenzied Vata energy, you hold the poses for longer and slowly, deliberately transition from one to the next. During your practice, you can engage your Mula Bandha for more stability and focus on longer exhales to ground your mind.

AshleyWest-1
Namaste Teacher Ashley West Roberts

Nutrition: Warm Up

As the weather cools, our need to heat up increases. Warm yourself from the inside out. Start with warm lemon water in the mornings and spicy herbal teas throughout the afternoon. For lunch and dinner, try cooked vegetables like asparagus, beets, carrots, and sweet potatoes with lots of ginger, cinnamon, and turmeric. Avoid sweets, cold dishes or drinks, dry fruits (apples or pears), and dairy products.

Lemon Tea

Mindfulness: Create Structure

It is important to create a routine during the Vata intense season in order to help the mind stay focused, and the body stay regular. Make a point to engage in some daily rituals like morning dry brushing (great for detoxification), Abhyanga/oil massage, or a warming meditation accompanied by soothing music. Other suggestions would be to choose movement activities that are not too strenuous, but instead focus on flexibility and balance. Seek out Hatha or Yin classes over Vinyasa based yoga in order to keep yourself balanced.

Wellness Tools

Spirituality: Feel Connected

Fall is one of the best seasons to get outside and experience nature’s transformation for yourself. Find a local park or hiking trail where you can sit and notice the brisk autumn winds, dewy mornings, and crinkly colored leaves. Do your best throughout the week to remind yourself of this connection you have with nature. Maybe it means having a small token, such as a beautiful leaf or pinecone, that sits with you on your desk. Another idea would be to rise early; Ayurveda recommends 6 AM during the Autumn months so that you can get the most sunlight possible as our days begin to shorten.

Dog Fall Outdoors


10174922_10202666021745158_698447662340860057_nA San Diego native, Emily moved to the Bay Area four years ago to work with small businesses and non-profits and help them share their stories. Outside of work you can find her hiking the Oakland hills with her dogs, cooking up healthy eats, or volunteering with organizations like Bay Area Wilderness Training.

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20

Mae’s Magic Chia Seed Pudding

At Namaste, we love sharing our favorite recipes. There are few things that can beat a delicious, nourishing meal that is also super healthy and easy to make! Last week our studio director, Mae Boscana, brought in her homemade Magic Chia Seed Pudding for us to try… needless to say it was amazing. Why do we go so far as to call it magical? Well it is equal parts healthy and delicious!

Chia seeds are incredibly nutritious. They contain loads of anti-oxidants, protein, fiber, and a good amount of Omega-3 Fatty Acids which are all great tools for helping lower blood pressure, increase weight loss, and reduce your risk of diabetes and heart disease! The best part is topping this sweet treat off with vanilla and cinnamon helps to satisfy your sugar cravings, while cinnamon lowers your blood sugar, reduces inflammation, and fights bacterial infections. How awesome is that? Now eat up!

Chia SeedMae’s Magic Chia Seed Pudding Recipe

1/3 cup chia seeds (you can find these at any health food store or most grocery stores now!)
1 1/2 cups nut milk of choice (We prefer unsweetened coconut/almond blend)
pinch of sea salt
1/2 tsp vanilla
5 cardamom pods
1/2 tsp fresh ground ginger
1/2 tsp fresh ground cinnamon
2 tsp maple syrup or agave

Instructions:

1.) Put all of the above items in a bowl or mason jar.

2.) Stir.

3.) Wait at least 2 hours or until chia seeds are not crunchy (30 min. may be just enough). Stir again if need be.

4.) Eat layered with fresh fruit. Our favorite is strawberries or blueberries!

Additional topping ideas include: Goji berries, Cocoa nibs, Bananas, Raspberries, Sliced Almonds, Walnuts, or Honey!

Enjoy for breakfast or lunch – although we highly recommend making some and keeping it in the fridge to satisfy your late night sweet tooth.

Chia Seed

 

 

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